Hair, Hair Styling

The Hairdresser’s Husband Hair Mist

I’ve been hoping that Lush would do a hairspray ever since I first started buying their products. I use hairspray almost every day to keep my style in place and it’s so difficult to find a decent product that’s not in a heinous aerosol container. Although most hairspray cans can be recycled, they often end up in landfill because they have to be 100% empty, otherwise they get categorised as hazardous waste.

The Hairdresser’s Husband is rather unique in the fact that Lush have designed the packaging with a detachable spritzer. The idea is you buy both the product and the spritzer the first time around and then you continue to buy the refill product and reuse the spritzer! It’s far better to reuse than recycle as most spritzer type attachments have difficulty being recycled anyway. I absolutely love this idea and hopefully Lush will pave the way forward for other companies to follow suit.

In terms of the product itself, the main ingredient that causes the ‘hold’ in the hair is Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). PVP is a hydrocarbon-based polymer and because there are no official definitions of some types of plastics, a convincing argument can be made one way or the other as to whether PVP should be defined as a plastic or not. Even though currently there’s no evidence that says that PVP is harmful for the environment, just to be sure, in the long run Lush are trying to find an alternative to this product. PVP forms a thin coating over the hair and hardens, allowing it to hold its position. I find it fixes the hair just as well as most other brands of hairspray do with just enough room for a restyle should you wish. The great thing about PVP is it’s easily washed and brushed out without leaving any residue or crispness behind.

The Hairdresser’s Husband also contains Fresh Grapefruit, Orange and Lemon Extracts as well as the essential oils from all three fruits. Anything citrus based encourages the hair cuticles to lie flat, reflecting more light for a fantastic shine! These ingredients are also great for breaking down any excess grease you might have on the hair! It also contains an ingredient called Ethyl Macadamiate, which is derived from macadamia nuts and forms a thin coating over the hair that’s highly protective and repels moisture, ensuring your style sets and stays all day long.

As you can imagine with a heap of zesty and refreshing citrus ingredients, the product’s scent is unmistakably citrus based. It’s the same scent as a perfume Lush currently have as part of their gold label range with the same name. This perfume was designed as a homage to hairdressing and to replicate intoxicating salon-like smells of shampoo and hair spray. As well as Orange, Lemon and Grapefruit the scent also contains Vanilla, Tonka, Oakmoss and Lemon Myrtle.

It’s a sweet, sexy and juicy citrus fragrance that really lingers in your hair as if you were wearing the perfume itself. I’ve had a lot of compliments about the ‘perfume’ I’m wearing when it’s simply just this hairspray!

In conclusion, I think The Hairdresser’s Husband is one of the best ideas Lush have had recently. I’m so grateful to finally have a hairspray that is completely recyclable and reusable, yet still works effectively. I’m really hoping this makes its way into all shops soon.

Ingredients

DRF Alcohol, Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), Water, Limonene, Fresh Grapefruit Extract, Fresh Lemon Extract, Fresh Orange Extract, Sicilian Lemon Oil, Ethyl Macadamiate, Brazilian Orange Oil, Grapefruit Oil, Lemon Myrtle Oil, Tonka Absolute, Vanilla Absolute, Cetrimonium Chloride, Anise Alcohol, Citral, Coumarin, Oakmoss Extract, Farnesol, Geraniol, Linalool, Perfume

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Hair, Hair Styling

Sea Spray Hair Mist

Sea Spray is the closest thing that Lush currently have in all stores to standard hair spray. It’s a great volumising mist that you spray all over the hair to give shine, body and hold.

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As you can imagine with a name like Sea Spray, this product is essentially a volumising salt spray. It contains Fine Sea Salt, along with mineral-rich Fresh Sea Water to increase volume. When salt dries on the hair it swells, giving a thicker feeling and appearance. Sea Spray also contains Glycerine and Carrageenan Extract which work together to hydrate the hair.

To keep that thicker effect lasting all day, Lush have added an ingredient called Polyvinylpyrrolidone or PVP for short, which forms a thin coating over the hair and helps to maintain it in the position you wish. PVP is a hydrocarbon-based polymer and because there are no official definitions of some types of plastics, a convincing argument can be made one way or the other as to whether PVP should be defined as a plastic or not. Even though currently there’s insufficient evidence that says that PVP is harmful for marine life, just to be sure, in the long run Lush are trying to find an alternative to this product.

The quantity of PVP isn’t as strong as it necessarily could be, so even after using Sea Spray, there’s room for movement. I find that it fixes hair nicely, but not too much that it leaves it feeling crisp or rough. Furthermore, because PVP is water soluble, it’s very easy to wash out.

You can use this product on both wet and dry hair, but I personally prefer to use it on damp hair before blow drying. I spray it at the roots and it leaves a nice textured effect that helps my generally thin hair appear fuller. On dry hair, it’s great for when you’re going for a messier look and it also leaves a glossy shine, thanks to Grapefruit Oil.

The Grapefruit Oil, along with Rosewood and Neroli Oils give Sea Spray an uplifting and refreshing scent, which I find lasts on the hair for most of the day. Each one of these essential oils is proven to be antibacterial and cleansing, paving the way for healthier hair too.

In conclusion, Sea Spray is a favourite product of mine to really help against my lack of volume. The only downside I have is it really doesn’t look good when your hair is on the greasier side in the day or so before you wash it. It would be great if perhaps Lush developed a similar product with less moisture perhaps?

Check out this wonderful hair mist here on the Lush UK website.

Ingredients

Carrageenan Extract, Fresh Sea Water, Glycerine, Perfume, Fine Sea Salt, Limonene, Linalool, Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), Neroli Oil, Grapefruit Oil, Rosewood Oil, Hydroxycitronellal, Geraniol, Citral, Farnesol, Benzyl Benzoate, Butylphenyl Methylpropional, Methylparaben

 

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Bath, Hair, Hair Styling

Dirty Styling Cream

Growing up, I always had trouble finding hair styling products that suited my hair. Because my hair is pretty thin and gets greasy easily, something too heavy will cause it to look flat and something too wet will cause it to look too greasy, so naturally I’m always wary before trying a new styling product. However, I started using Dirty a good while ago now and I’m really happy with it.

Now I don’t use Dirty all the time, I change my hair length a lot and I prefer using Dirty when my hair is on the shorter side and Hair Custard for when it’s longer. The creamy consistency turns more into a paste when you’re rubbing it in your hands but still remains light on the hair and because of its matte finish, it goes completely unnoticed. Another major bonus is that a little goes a long way, so your tub will last you months for sure.

What causes the hair to retain it’s shape after using Dirty is Polyvinylpyrrolidone or PVP for short. PVP is a hydrocarbon-based polymer and because there are no official definitions of some types of plastics, a convincing argument can be made one way or the other as to whether PVP should be defined as a plastic or not. Even though currently there’s insufficient evidence that says that PVP is harmful for marine life but just to be sure, in the long run, Lush are trying to find an alternative to this product. Other than this, Dirty also contains Japan and Candelilla Waxes to further help with the hold. Lush describe it as having a medium hold that’s perfect for everyday hairstyling.

Furthermore, Dirty isn’t just a one trick pony as it also contains ingredients to nourish and protect the hair such as Coconut Oil, Illipe Butter, Cocoa Butter and Linseed Mucilage. Linseeds are rich in proteins, minerals, vitamins and oils and can be boiled to produce a gel like texture that is highly protective and gives hair extra shine. Because of these ingredients, Dirty leaves hair flexible and is actually very easily washed out or even simply brushed out without leaving any annoying residue that’s hard to remove.

In terms of scent, Dirty is obviously part of the Dirty range, yet doesn’t have any minty notes that the range is predominately known for. It’s got an earthy and woody smell of Sandalwood Oil, mixed with Pine and Oakmoss Absolute but there’s also grassy, lemony notes from an infusion of Balm Herb. Whilst I wouldn’t say it’s my favourite Lush smell that I’d desperately want in my hair, it’s refreshing and the scent remains in the hair a good couple of days after you last used it. What’s really unique about the Dirty range, is that even though not all of the products smell the same, apparently if you layer up each product, you get the true ‘Dirty’ scent.

Like I said, Dirty has been a staple of mine for a while now and continues to be one of the best styling products I’ve ever used, so I’d definitely recommend everyone at least trying it! You can check it out and purchase it for yourself here over at the Lush UK website.

Ingredients

Linseed Mucilage, Balm Herb Infusion, Japan Wax, Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), Propylene Glycol, Extra Virgin Coconut Oil, Stearic Acid, Organic Illipe Butter, Candelilla Wax, Triethanolamine, Fair Trade Organic Cocoa Butter, Cetearyl Alcohol, Sandalwood Oil, Pine Oil, Oakmoss Absolute, Linalool, Limonene, Hydroxycitronellal, Geraniol, Alpha-Isomethyl Ionone, Perfume, Methylparaben

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