Bath, Bath Bombs

Figaro Figaro Bath Bomb

Figaro Figaro is a bath bomb that’s supposedly great for unblocking your sinuses and your vocal cords with Lush suggesting it’s a great aromatic remedy to help you find your voice after losing it. It’s a little on the small side, but features a slightly lower than average price tag and contains a complex, grounding scent.

Figaro Figaro contains a long list of different essential oils, the majority of which you’d be likely to find in medicines and remedies for coughs, sore throats and blocked noses. I’d argue that the aromas that stand out the most are the Fennel, the Aniseed and the Eucalyptus, offering a warming liquorice note with a refreshing sharpness. Sage and Thyme add a more generic herbal layer to the product whist there’s delicate florals from Chamomile and Lavender. Lastly Brazilian Orange gives the whole fragrance a slight fruity note and there’s definitely that familiar touch of minty freshness too. It’s a complex scent for sure, but all the components work and compliment each other well, resulting in a scent not too dissimilar to herbal cough syrups and lozenges. Although a lovely smell, it’s a shame it isn’t a little stronger.

The other benefit of having all these ingredients inside a bath bomb is they’ll do wonders for the skin too. Aniseed, Fennel, Peppermint and Eucalyptus are great for easing your muscles thanks to their stimulating properties. Orange and Thyme have cleansing, antibacterial and toning qualities and Lavender, Chamomile and Sage soothe and clam the skin.

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In the water, Figaro Figaro erupts with vivid shades of deep reds and bright yellows. For a smaller-sized bath bomb it packs a punch with the colour and before long my bath had settled into warm red water. As an adorable little touch, inside the product is a paper scroll which pops out near the end of the fizz and unfurls to reveal lyrics from The Barber of Seville, an opera which is the source of inspiration for this bath bomb. It’s these little touches that really make Lush’s products seem as though a lot of thought has gone into them.

The only downside was the lack of scent. For something that’s supposedly to help with sore throats etc, the scent was pretty much non-existent once dissolved and I didn’t feel like it was doing anything it said it would, which was majorly disappointing as that’s what I was most excited about. Once I was out and dry, my skin did feel soft and refreshed and on a more mindful level, I felt calm and relaxed but as expected, little to no remnants of the fragrance was remaining on my skin.

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As a whole concept, I love Figaro Figaro. I think creating a bath bomb to really help with colds and blocked airways is a great idea and something I’d definitely be interested in. This just didn’t hit the mark and it seems silly that they released a product intended to do all of these things with such a gentle scent. I hate to say it but I’m really disappointed with this one.

Ingredients

Sodium Bicarbonate, Citric Acid, Aniseed Oil, Chamomile Blue Oil, Eucalyptus Oil, Fennel Oil, Lavender Oil, Brazilian Orange Oil, Peppermint Oil, Sage Oil, Thyme Oil, Water, Gardenia Extract, Cream of Tartar, Dipropylene Glycol, Sodium Coco Sulfate, Cocamidopropyl Betaine, Limonene, Colour 47005, Colour 17200, Colour 59040, Colour 42090

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Bath, Bath Bombs

Ne Worry Pas Bath Bomb

Ne Worry Pas is an old school bath bomb that I believe was first released in 2006, if not before. Aside from being back a couple of times on the Lush Kitchen, it finally made a comeback as part of Lush’s 30th Anniversary (of the bath bomb) Collection. The idea behind the strange purple hole was that you’re supposed to whisper your worries into it and watch as they fizz away with the ballistic and then drain down the plughole. After all, ‘ne worry pas’ is French for don’t worry.

As you’d imagine, the scent of Ne Worry Pas is calming and comforting. It’s very violet-led, making me expect to see Violet Leaf in in the ingredients list, although it doesn’t actually feature. It’s clear that this note in the perfume comes from the mysterious ‘perfume’ ingredient which is what Lush hide their secret fragrance formulas behind. Instead, we’ve been given a list of Jasmine Asbolute, Cedarwood Oil and Bergamot Oil. Seductive Jasmine Absolute adds floral and sensual notes in the perfume which bolster the overarching violet aroma whilst Bergamot adds a hint of uplifting freshness. Lush have also added Cedarwood Oil for woody undertones. The whole scent really reminds me of my favourite sweets – parma violets! So it’s a winner for me.

Lush have further included Soybean Flour inside Ne Worry Pas and each time I see this ingredient inside a bath product, I know I’m in for a treat. When this flour is put in contact with warm water it creates a rich, softening milk that will really soothe the skin and make it feel gorgeously soft.

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In the water, Ne Worry Pas isn’t the most exciting bath bomb unfortunately. Once upon a time, it used to contain a hidden green centre inside it but this version is simply pain old creamy white. I would have loved if the sparkly purple hole had led to a hidden purple core but sadly not, the purple existed in a couple of wisps and that was it. Although there wasn’t anything visually exciting, the excitement came in an olfactory sense as the aroma was really quite potent as the bath bomb fizzed away, filling my bathroom.

Once I was in, the water felt luxurious and soft as the Soybean Flour really got to work on my skin, which felt beautiful once I was out. I will say although my skin felt smooth, I did feel the need to moisturise even still as there’s a difference between your skin being soft, and being hydrated. Nonetheless the violet scent was exuding from my skin for hours after as if I were wearing it as a perfume, which I absolutely loved! What a nice bonus!

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In conclusion, Ne Worry Pas is definitely worth trying! I believe it’s currently on it’s way out, just like a lot of the other 30th anniversary bath bombs but if you can manage to get your hands on one, definitely do! I definitely think we need some more violet scented bath products!

Ingredients

Sodium Bicarbonate, Citric Acid, Soybean Flour, Perfume, Titanium Dioxide, Bergamot Oil, Jasmine Absolute, Cedarwood Oil, DRF Alcohol, Synthetic Fluorphlogopite, Tin Oxide, Alpha-Isomethyl Ionone, Isoeugenol, Limonene, Colour 77491, Colour 45430:1, Colour 42090:1

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Bath, Bath Bombs

Strawberries and Cream Bath Bomb

I feel like this is a very quintessential British bath bomb, it especially was over the summer what with Wimbledon going on anyhow. As you can see in the pictures, Strawberries and Cream is comprised of two bath bomb halves sandwiched together with a layer of soft butter. Lush suggest that you can actually twist and separate the two halves to share your bath bomb across two baths or with a loved one! I disagree, as Strawberries and Cream is a little smaller than your usual bath bomb, I’d prefer to keep the entire thing for myself. Which is exactly what I did.

Strawberries and Cream shares its scent with the ‘Yummy Mummy’ range and ever since I ran out of the shower gel of the same name I’ve been longing for something to fill the void. The Yummy Mummy scent is super fruity, with a sweet decadence about it. Bergamot and Geranium give uplifting and bright fragrance notes with the addition of Olibanum offering a deeper, creamy richness. Lush have also added a dash of Black Pepper, drawing on a culinary trick to bring out the fruitiness in desserts. I find it’s a very moreish aroma, but I do think it works best in a shower gel format rather than a bath bomb. There’s almost something chocolatey in the aforementioned gel, which I find is missing in this bomb.

Strawberries and Cream contains actual Strawberry Powder, although it’s not included for the scent as strawberries themselves don’t have much of a potent aroma. Instead the powder is for toning and brightening the skin with the heaps of antioxidant properties it has. Generally speaking, anything that’s super beneficial for you to consume is going to be good for your skin too! It’s why Lush’s products are often filled with fresh fruits and veg!

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In the water, this bath bomb puts on a real great show, sending out waves of bright red colours into the surrounding water, mixed with creamy white and a hint of green from the ‘stalk’. As the bath bomb is fairy quick to dissolve, you’re left with the Cocoa and Shea Butter centre that’ll begin to imbue the bath with its skin-softening benefits. I noticed just how silky and moisturising the water was almost immediately as I got in and whatsmore, the scent really amplified and filled my senses with the comforting aroma, perfect for a long relaxing soak on a crisp evening. Oddly, there was weird brown powdery globs floating throughout my bath, which I initially thought was cocoa powder, but I guess it’s the strawberry powder instead. The globs eventually disappeared into the water, it just wasn’t that pretty to start with.

After my bath was drained out and I had towelled myself off, the creamy sweet scent was still lingering over my skin and in my bathroom for the remainder of my evening, really making me happy each time I stepped back into the room. My skin felt incredibly soft and renewed as well as wonderfully hydrated, meaning I didn’t feel the need to moisturise before bed.

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All in all, Strawberries and Cream makes for a really great bath, I urge everyone to try it! I’m still holding out hope we’ll see the return of Yummy Mummy Shower Gel, maybe for Mother’s Day 2020? My fingers are crossed.

Ingredients

Sodium Bicarbonate, Citric Acid, Fair Trade Organic Cocoa Butter, Water, Olibanum Oil, Bergamot Oil, Geranium Oil, Black Pepper Oil, Cream of Tartar, Strawberry Powder, Fair Trade Shea Butter, Laureth 4, Sodium Laureth Sulfate, Lauryl Betaine, Dipropylene Glycol, Benzyl Alcohol, Hexyl Cinnamal, Limonene, Perfume, Colour 14700, Colour 47005, Colour 45410, Colour 42090

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Bath, Bath Bombs

Goldrush Bath Bomb

Along with Hi Ho Silver, these bath bombs were based around gold and silver respectively and are among Lush’s most glittery creations ever. Goldrush is a smallish (about the size of a Butterball) blue bath bomb with a gold stamp featuring the letters ‘Au’ on it. Au is the symbol for gold on the periodic table which comes from its latin name – aurum.

Goldrush is supposedly scented with the same uplifting scent as Whoosh Shower Jelly and when I first heard it was so, I was rather excited as I’ve been hoping for other Whoosh scented products for a long time. Whoosh is a fairly potent fragrance, with the jelly exuding zesty Lemon and Lime along with background notes of Rosemary, Geranium and Grapefruit.

Although Goldrush features the three essential oils that I mentioned make up the background of Whoosh’s scent, it doesn’t contain any form of Lemon or Lime and therefore you can’t really consider it to be an exact replica of the zingy fragrance as they’re essentially the main notes. Instead, Goldrush offers a warmer perfume with the Grapefruit giving a fruitiness above herbal notes of Rosemary and floral hints of Geranium. Compared to the shower jelly, the scent isn’t very strong at all and I’m a little disappointed they didn’t try to recreate the scent exactly as it should be. I feel they should have included Lemon Oil at least! There is some likeness, but not enough for me.

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Once in the water, after a minute or so of simply expanding with blue foam, out poured the heaps of golden lustre from inside, which looked really striking against the vivid blue. Goldrush is actually over 15% glitter, which is more than any other bath bomb! The end result was stunning and I couldn’t stop watching the sparkling golden particles dance through the water. You have to be a real glitter fan to enjoy this bath bomb and luckily, I am!

The golden hallmark actually works much like a bath melt. It’s comprised of Cocoa Butter, Shea Butter and Almond Oil which melts into the water and hydrates your skin. I actually surprisingly found Goldrush to be quite moisturising thanks to this little inclusion. It’s also what helps the lustre stick to your skin and I came out covered. I couldn’t stop admiring my sparkling self!

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With the scent not really being particularly strong, naturally I didn’t find it at all that noticeable whilst I was bathing and whilst there was a slight remembrance left on my skin after it wasn’t anything compared to the reminder of all the glitter! My skin did feel incredibly soft and nourished though, meaning I didn’t feel the need to moisturise before bed!

I really loved Goldrush, though simply because of the colour and the glitter. I do wish they had got the Whoosh scent right and even without it, I’d have wanted the scent to be stronger. The glitter did end up covering my bath, my towel and my bath mat but that’s nothing a bit of cleaning won’t rectify and it’s well worth it! I’d definitely use Goldrush again!

Ingredients

Sodium Bicarbonate, Citric Acid, Synthetic Fluorphlogopite, Fair Trade Organic Cocoa Butter, Grapefruit Oil, Rosemary Oil, Geranium Oil, Cream of Tartar, Water, Fair Trade Shea Butter, Almond Oil, Titanium Dioxide, Dipropylene Glycol, Laureth 4, Sodium Coco Sulfate, Cocamidopropyl Betaine, Silica, Tin Oxide, Citral, Citronellol, Geraniol, Limonene, Linalool, Perfume, Colour 42090, Colour 77491

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Bath, Bath Bombs

Peng Bath Bomb

Peng is like the ultimate summer bath bomb. It’s literally designed to look like a beach ball which makes it really appealing, especially because we’ve not had much of a summer this year in the UK. I’m not sure on the name though, Peng is a terribly British slang word for something or someone attractive and it’s awful. I tried explaining it to an American friend and it’s just a no from me. As always, Lush love to feel like they’re really down with the kids.

Peng didn’t initially stand out to me but after looking at the ingredients list, I was quite excited when I first saw it whilst researching the 30th anniversary range of bath bombs. Containing Sandalwood, Rosewood, Styrax Resinoid and Litsea Cubeba, I imagined it to have a sweet woody fragrance, with simple lemony undertones. When I physically got my hands on it, I was a little disheartened as it isn’t quite what I expected.

The lemony fragrance of Litsea Cubeba is definitely the strongest aroma to come through and I found myself wondering if they’d perhaps fragranced it like a Dragon’s Egg by mistake as the two smell quite similar. Underneath the main note, there is a slight woodiness from both Sandalwood and Rosewood Oils but I’m afraid they’re nothing more than a delicate touch.  It’s a little less overtly citrusy and more fruity than Dragon’s Egg but honestly I don’t think they’re that different. I guess the cinnamon-like warmth from the Styrax offers a tad more distinction, but it’s nothing notable and not what I wanted, so I guess I’m a little disgruntled.

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I was hoping that Peng would make up for betraying my hopes with a nice show in the water and to be fair, it did. The three primary colours fizz out pretty quickly whist the white sections are a little slower at dissolving but it was much foamier than I thought it would be. Even though the blue was mostly outshined by the other two colours, it actually made for some pretty bath art before turning a warm shade of orange. Even that reminded me of Dragon’s Egg, just without the lustre!

Whilst I was bathing, the aroma filled my bathroom, which did bring out more of those woodier notes with the Litsea Cubeba drawing into the background slightly, which was nice to experience. The effect of the scent as a whole had an uplifting and energising effect on my mood which I really needed after a long few days. Afterwards my skin was feeling refreshed and rejuvenated and the scent lingered lightly on my skin up until I went to bed that evening.

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In conclusion, I didn’t dislike Peng as such, but I can’t say I liked it that much either, it really wasn’t what I though it was going to be and compared to some of the other bath bombs available, it’s nothing special.

Ingredients

Sodium Bicarbonate, Citric Acid, Disodium Lauryl Sulfosuccinate, Rosewood Oil, Styrax Resinoid, Litsea Cubeba Absolute, Sandalwood Oil, Water, Propylene Glycol, Dipropylene Glycol, Citral Isoeugenol, Limonene, Linalool, Perfume, Colour 47005, Colour 45410, Colour 14700, Colour 42090:2, Colour 17200, Colour 42090, Colour 45410:1

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Bath, Bath Bombs

Dragon’s Egg Bath Bomb

Dragon’s Egg has long been one of Lush’s most popular and most well known bath bombs. On the outside, I guess it looks relatively boring, except for a few flicks of colour. On the inside however, this egg contains a bright orange yolk, popping candy, colourful confetti and lots of golden shimmering glitter.

Dragon’s Egg doesn’t appeal to me personally all that much because of it’s predominantly citrusy aroma. Containing lots of Lemon Oil, it has a zesty and somewhat sharp scent that the fruit is well known for. Mix in some Bergamot Oil to lighten the scent with sunny and brighter notes and some Jasmine Absolute for a touch of floral warmth and you’ve got a fragrance that’s still fairly zesty and refreshing but with an uplifting and comforting side to it also. Although it’s not the scent for me, I can understand why people love it so much, it’s definitely a great bath bomb to energise your mind. Furthermore, these three essential oils are well known for their abilities to relieve fatigue and fight off depression and anxiety.

In the water, Dragon’s Egg is one of the slower dissolving bath bombs. It immediately foams up a brilliant white colour and continues to bob around doing so for a good five minutes, with coloured circular confetti detaching every now and then and floating off. After a short while, its orange core reveals itself and the real display begins, changing the water to a bright golden orange colour. Mixed in with the orange centre is a tonne of golden glitter which dances below the surface and looks gorgeous glimmering in the light. If the impact on your nose isn’t enough, you’ll definitely be able to hear the crackling of the popping candy! It’s definitely worth the long wait for this bath bomb to dissolve because it creates some really pretty bath art.

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Dragon’s Egg would be a great bath bomb to use in the morning because the scent really wakes you up, especially because you can still smell it in the air long after the bomb has disappeared. Sat in the bath I felt really refreshed and renewed and my skin was already feeling great thanks to the cleansing and toning benefits of the Lemon Oil, I really noticed it looked visibly brighter once I was out, but that might just be the dusting of glitter left on my body! Naturally, being such a strong scent, it definitely lingers on you for quite some time after.

One thing I do find about Dragon’s Egg is that it’s not the best for sensitive skins. The citrus oils it contains are rather harsh on any delicate or damaged skin, including rashes and especially cuts, so do be careful with this one as it will sting. I also find it can be quite drying on my skin also, but that’s nothing a body lotion can’t rectify.

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In conclusion, Dragon’s Egg is a decent bath bomb and I’m sure I’d love it a lot more if I enjoyed the smell. Now I’ve got this post out of the way, I doubt I’ll be using it again for myself but with it remaining as one of Lush’s most popular bath bombs, I doubt we’ll be saying goodbye to it anytime soon.

Ingredients

Sodium Bicarbonate, Citric Acid, Perfume, Popping Candy, Lemon Oil, Bergamot Oil, Jasmine Absolute, Cream of Tartar, Water, Gardenia Extract, Titanium Dioxide, Sodium Laureth Sulfate, Lauryl Betaine, Propylene Glycol, Synthetic Fluorphlogopite, Tin Oxide, Silica, Citral, Limonene, Linalool, Colour 15510, Colour 17200, Colour 14700, Colour 45410, Colour 77491, Rice Paper

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Bath, Bath Bombs

Guardian Of The Forest Bath Bomb

Guardian Of The Forest has been around for quite some time now and I believe it debuted in 2015 as an Oxford Street exclusive product. Recently it became available in all stores year-round but sadly is about to be discontinued for good. This is a bath bomb I’ve used before but not for a while, not since I started this blog anyway. Of course I had to ensure I managed to use it one last time, both for blogging reasons and to say goodbye.

I love the design of this beautiful bath bomb as it’s got something really quite magical about it, especially with a name like Guardian Of The Forest. It conjures up ideas of woodland deities and enchanted forests you might hear about in fairytales and storybooks. It’s also scented rather beautifully too in my opinion.

Containing both Oakmoss, Cypress and Rosewood Oils, its no surprise that the scent is intensely green and earthy. Oakmoss has a deep, mossy aroma – adding the poignant earthy note to the fragrance. Woody Cypress Oil blends well with Oakmoss, adding greener, fresher notes and it’s really these two ingredients that made up the strongest portion of the scent. Aromatherapists believe Cypress to be calming during times of emotional stress and use it to stimulate feelings of joy and happiness. Rosewood Oil has a unique aroma that’s equally rosy, spicy and woody, adding something a little more complex but further mixing with the Oakmoss and Cypress well. Lastly, Guardian Of The Forest contains Lime Oil, giving subtle citrusy, zesty undertones.

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The resulting fragrance is deep and meditative, yet remaining bright, gentle and slightly sweet. Whenever I smell this perfume I can’t help but imagine walking through tall forests in the summertime, with lots of mossy undergrowth and basking in the nature around me. I really love scents that transport me elsewhere.

In the bath, Guardian Of The Forest is foamy and fizzy, colouring the water a luscious green colour almost immediately, with gorgeous patterns comprised of different shades of green and white on top. Before long, a stream of yellow revealed itself, intertwining with the green and resulting in some awesome bath art. It may not look it, but Guardian Of The Forest is filled with sparkling silver glitter too, which looked really beautiful floating through the water.

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Even after the bath bomb had fully dissolved, I could still smell the grounding aroma in the air which really helped me relax into my bath, it was really quite potent and even after I was out and dry, I was still able to smell it on my body. Although there’s no ingredients that really stand out for their soothing and softening properties, my skin felt so baby smooth and silky after this bath, I was seriously impressed. The silver lustre also lightly coated me too, which is a great bonus in my eyes.

To conclude, I’m quite sad that Guardian of The Forest is leaving us, likely for a long while if not forever, but I’m glad that I managed to use it one last time before it went. If you’ve not already, you definitely want to give it a go, don’t miss out!

Ingredients

Sodium Bicarbonate, Citric Acid, Cypress Oil, Lime Oil, Rosewood Oil, Oakmoss Absolute, Cream of Tartar, Water, Titanium Dioxide, Sodium Laureth Sulfate, Lauryl Betaine, Synthetic Fluorphlogopite, Tin Oxide, Amyl Cinnamal, Benzyl Alcohol, Benzyl Salicylate, Citronellol, Benzyl Benzoate, Limonene, Linalool, Perfume, Colour 19140, Colour 19140:1, Colour 42090:2, Colour 59040, Colour 42053, Colour 14700, Colour 45350, Colour 77491, Colour 47005:1

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